What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On?

What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On
Big Rideau Lake – Wikipedia.

Where do Eamon and Bec live?

A Toronto-based couple who live and travel full-time in our self converted Sprinter Van. While on the road we run our chai company Chaiwala Chai, Our goal here is to inspire you to chase after your own dreams however big (or small. tiny homes anyone?) they may be! We hope to create a community of like-minded, positive individuals who will grow to love and support one another on their own journeys.

Where is Big Rideau Lake?

“T’is a blue gem like none other”. – We have a treasury of fresh water lakes here in Canada, a legacy of more lakes than on all the rest of our blue-green planet. Just as each person on our planet is unique in features and personality nurtured through their years, so is Big Rideau Lake carved like none other in shape, shoreline and natural history.

  • It has its own spirit: serene to stormy, and its own history molded through millions, indeed billions of years.
  • To fathom the personality of the Big Rideau, we must map its many layers, understand its many facets and cherish its many bounties.
  • With a surface area of over 100 sq.
  • Km., Big Rideau Lake is the largest body of water in eastern Ontario.

Its assembly of bays and islands give it a shape as unique as any fingerprint. With a geological history that spans a billion years, the Big Rideau Lake is a blue gem set among some of the oldest rocks and minerals of our continent. Its basin was fashioned by a collision of continents.

Long before the Age of Dinosaurs, even before primitive life forms moved onto land, great snow-capped peaks and treeless valleys extended from present-day Labrador through the Rideau area all the way to Kansas. These ranges have been named the Grenville Mountains. Deep beneath these Himalayan-scale peaks, Mother Nature’s “Shake and Bake” forged a great mix of minerals that are now found beneath and around the Big Rideau.

Paddle your canoe into Horseshoe Bay along the North Shore. Discover crystals of mica in wave and ice carved rock outcrops. Some theorize that mica provided the molecular template for first life. Beyond theory, it is fact that mica weathers into clay platelets.

Those tiny platelets enrich soils. Clays nurtured the great stands of pine and oak that thrived on the banks of the Big Rideau. Indigenous people camped on the Big Rideau’s shores through past millennia and found shelter and resources among the forests. The clays in our local Farmington loam sustained the crops of pioneer families such as the Chipmans, Boltons and Sheldons who settled within sight of the Big Rideau two centuries ago.

The Giles, Chants, Myers, Grahams and other farm families prospered on the fertile lands around Portland after the building of the Rideau Canal. And in the early 1890’s hexagonal “sheets” of mica were mined at Murphy’s Point for the fronts of parlor stoves and insulators in radio tubes.

  • How many young of age and heart have shouted with glee when they discovered “Gold” while wading a rocky shore of the Big Rideau? These cubic crystals sparkle in the summer sun.
  • Sorry, kids! It was only pyrite.
  • Sorry, too that you will find no diamonds in the Rideau’s rocky ledges and islands.
  • But you can find tiny flakes of diamond’s darker sister, graphite.

With a flake of this Cinderella sister, you can sketch your name. Or you can fish in Sheldon Bay with an unbreakable rod made of graphite fibres. These are just three of over fifty minerals that you can find in our Rideau area within that great natural laboratory, the Canadian Shield and its branch, the Frontenac Axis. What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On Geologic Map of Big Rideau Lake – This segment of the Westport Sheet of the Geological Survey of Canada illustrates Big Rideau Lake in white. To its north, the Rideau Lake Laccolith is shown in red. The diversity of colours around this laccolith is just a hint of the very complex minerology and geology of the Canadian Shield.

  1. This ancient core of North Continent, of igneous and metamorphic rocks extends around James and Hudson Bays to the Arctic.
  2. The geology illustrated on the south side of the Big Rideau is much less colourful and less complex; illustrating the much younger sedimentary strata of the St.
  3. Lawrence Plain.
  4. Its subdued landscape was more suited for human activity and infrastructure.

Then there are the rocks, Nature’s mix of minerals. Paddle your canoe along the North Shore, ponder a cliff of igneous rock, a face of the Rideau Lake laccolith. Within this gigantic rock blister, super-hot magma cooled and crystallized into quartz, feldspar, micas and other minerals, the stuff of granite.

Then paddle into Horseshoe Bay. Peel away the moss at water’s edge. Marvel at a metamorphic rock called gneiss where bands of quartz, feldspar and maybe some hornblende prove that even solid rock can be baked and stirred under the enormous heat and pressures of mountain building. Park your paddle on the gunwales in Briton Bay or by the shore of Big Island.

Look carefully at outcrops of lime silicate. Where freshly scraped, this rock is white and brilliant in sunlight. It is because of this white rock that geologists call our part of Ontario the “White Province”. Where it has been exposed to weather for decades, you can scoop away stained cubic crystals of this soft rock by the handful.

  1. This almost pure calcite is the same mineral as in your teeth and bones.
  2. Maybe it should be called a marble but no statue of David could be carved from our local granular lime silicate.
  3. But pioneers kilned it to make plaster.
  4. Though you will find a few tiny crystals of pyrite, graphite and other minerals, this local rock is almost pure calcium carbonate.

Some of the Big Rideau basin and shorelines are composed of this white rock. Its origin may pre-date the heaving up of the Grenville Mountains in pre-Cambrian time. One theory holds that it formed as a mud in an ancient sea. Maybe ancient micro-organisms took some of the abundant carbon dioxide out of our early atmosphere and combined it with calcium dissolved in an ancient sea.

Later, this primordial mud was baked during the creation of the Grenville Mountains and this unique lime silicate metamorphosed into rock. Being much softer on the Moh Scale of Hardness than the granite walls of the North Shore it is easily eroded. These local calcium carbonate rocks bring us a great benefit.

In Grade 10 Science, we learned that calcium carbonate neutralizes acids. As we humans pollute our environment with acid rain, the Big Rideau is buffered by Mother Nature’s own form of Bufferin against acidification and sterility. But there is at least one more of the numerous geological features of the Big Rideau that make it unique among lakes of our country.

  • The Rideau Fault Line clearly defines the North Shore of Big Rideau Lake.
  • It is as identifiable as a scar on a fingerprint.
  • It extends beneath The Narrows, under Westport and south-westerly beneath a series of other lakes.
  • The Rideau Fault is termed a “normal” fault.
  • One side (north) of this gigantic crack in our Earth’s crust has been forced upwards, exposing the North Shore’s rugged pre-Cambrian face.

The down side (south) of this normal fault is masked beneath the much younger sedimentary strata of the St. Lawrence Plain. On the lake you can see these layers of early Paleozoic sandstone and dolomite where waves splash the ledges along Hudson Bay and Sherwood Shores.

This beautiful Cambrian sandstone has been masoned into a landmark church, other fine buildings in Portland and the local locks of the Rideau Canal. The Rideau Lake Fault is unlike other known and active faults such as the San Andreas Fault of California. “Will the Rideau Lake Fault ever shake and quake?” Will terrified citizens of Westport ever bundle kids and precious possessions into cars, abandon the rubble of their community and seek shelter in Delta? Or will citizens of Portland ever have to search through the shattered rubble of their waterfront homes that have been dumped high and dry by a tsunami? Not likely! Normal Faults tend to happen where and when a continent is being pulled apart.

East Africa? Yes! Rideau country? Not now! Fortunately for us, the Rideau Lake Fault is very ancient and now quite stable. Instead of a lurking source of disaster, the Rideau Lake Fault is a boon. In cross-section, the water body of Big Rideau Lake is wedge-shaped.

  1. The deepest water (approx.125 m.) is near the North Shore, north of the Rideau Fault Line.
  2. However, toward the south shore the lake is shallow.
  3. This great range of water depths was a bonus for indigenous fishers of past millennia.
  4. The Rideau provided a spectrum of aquatic habitats for fish and waterfowl to be caught and cured at migratory seasonal camps.

Further, before the Canal was built, the shallows of the south shore provided explorers, fishersand theirfamilies with “The Landing”, Portland’s original name. This was a place to portage from the Rideau system of lakes and river over to the Gananoque system.

More recently, each year as winter approaches and the Big Rideau water invert in temperature, northerly winds push chilled surface water into the shallows of Portland Bay. Here, ice forms early and thick. A century ago, this dependable ice supported vast skids of logs on “Mill Bay”, awaiting sawing at Toffey’s (Bolton’s) Mill.

The sawmill is long gone but now each January speed skaters from near and far come to “Skate the Lake” on the natural ice of Portland Bay. It is safe for the local Zamboni and the throngs of skaters and fans, mugs of hot chocolate clutched by mitted hands.

But look to the north. A couple kilometers across the snow-covered ice, steam rises from the ice-free and blue water of the Big Rideau Lake. I’ve highlighted just a few of the wonders of the Big Rideau, legacies from the past billion years and more. Consider that a tiny fraction of that, a million years, is but a mere moment in our planet’s history.

But within thatsaga of The Big Rideau, great sheets of ice accumulated on the highlands of northern Quebec and Labrador. Repeatedly they oozed and scrapped across our landscape, sculpturing it from the north-east toward the south-west. By coincidence of geology and time, this was also the grain of the ancient Grenville Mountains, eroded to their ‘roots’ by a billion years of wind and rain.

  • The recurring ice ages polished the hard ridges and gouged soft cavities from these remnant roots.
  • Look at a topographic map or an aerial photo of the Big Rideau.
  • Note that the ridges, the islands and the bays have a lineation, like a table top of polished oak.
  • There is a grain to Rideau’s landscape; an orientation, N.E.

to S.W.; a sense of direction recognized and used on foggy mornings by legendary fishing guides of the past century like George Carr and Hermie Morris. It is also one of the many ways the Spirit of the Rideau spoke to the original indigenous people. What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On The Blue and the Green; the Paradise of The Big Rideau. Looking westward toward the Narrows Lock seen in the distant centre near the horizon. Note the lineation N.E. to S.W. of the islands in the foreground, a legacy from the Grenville Mountains a billion years ago and from the Pleistocene Ice Ages a mere million years ago.

Further, this picture is testament that after two centuries of accelerated human impact, the blues and greens of Nature still dominate the Spirit of the Big Rideau. What’s more, the most recent ice sheet melted and retreated from Rideau Country a mere 10 000 years ago. It exposed a legacy of drumlin hills around Forfar, ground moraine, mineral-rich parent material for a myriad of local soils, sustenance for a further myriad of mid-latitude forests.

Its icy melt-waters shaped our landscape leaving raised beaches, spillways, ponds and lakes which provided habitat for many fish and waterfowl found in Rideau country today. These are some of the legacies-in-landscape of the Pleistocene Ice Age that you can see and appreciate beyond the shorelines of the Big Rideau.

And there are glacial landscapes that you cannot readily see. Scuba divers tell of amazing bottom-scapes of beaches and ledges hidden beneath Rideau’s blue water and white caps. Perceptions of Big Rideau Lake have been expressed in saga and song through the ages. Indigenous people told of watery highways and byways, of living in harmony with their environment.

They were awed by the spirit of the Big Rideau, a spirit that was at times violent, but always bountiful. In the 1700s, maps of the Rideau were drawn on birch bark and parchment by European explorers, missionaries and traders. In 1802, Reuben Sherwoodsurveyed a town line across the Big Rideau.

  • Others followed with circumferentors and chains, measuring and mapping the Rideau countryside and shorelines into lots and concessions.
  • Only then could pioneer families legally settle its shores, pay taxes and accelerate the human impact on the Big Rideau and its hinterland.
  • Forests were cleared.
  • Soil were broken.

A great Canal was built, altering lake, shoreline and hinterland. Fields widened and farms prospered. Soils and nutrients flushed into the Rideau. A succession of maps have been drawn chronicling sites of seasonal cottages of families who treasured the Rideau environs, of year-round residences and the infrastructures of roads and railroads, power and telephone lines, stores and marinas to support settlement.

A century ago, the Garretts hosted guests at their island fishing lodge and Viscount Kingsmill spent summers, even some winters at his Shangri’la on Grindstone Island. The Atlas of the Rideau chronicles our “fast-forward” into the era of human impact. Now more than ever, we must understand the many facets of this gem, natural and human, past and present.

Only by appreciating our unique legacy of the Big Rideau, a billion years-in-the-making, may we realize our responsibility to preserve and protect our gem and its many facets. Indeed! The Big Rideau is a blue gem like none other.

Where does the Rideau River flow?

Our Watershed – The Rideau River drains an area of over 4,000 square kilometres of Eastern Ontario. The main stem of the river flows in a northerly direction from Upper Rideau Lake near Newboro to the City of Ottawa where it tumbles over Rideau Falls into the Ottawa River.

  1. Total length of the longest part of the watershed is about 180 kilometres.
  2. From the highest point in the valley (Carnahan Lake in the Tay sub-watershed) to the Ottawa River is a drop of 204 metres in elevation.
  3. About 620,000 people live in the watershed including a large part of the City of Ottawa, the fourth largest metropolitan area in Canada.

There are 18 municipalities within the valley and most people, outside of Ottawa, draw their drinking water from the river or from groundwater.

Are Eamon and Bec rich?

What is the net worth of YouTube stars Eamon & Bec? – Though sites differ on how much Eamon and Bec are worth exactly, it is estimated that their fortune is somewhere between $500,000 and $1.5 million. It cost the couple $20,000 to convert their van into a livable space.

Bec and Eamon added solar panels, water tanks, insulation, a refrigerator, a composting toilet, and a stovetop to their 60 square foot space. Their van has provided them with a lot of video content over the years, and their other DIY content has allowed them to build a subscriber list of nearly one million accounts.

The internet stars also make money by featuring advertisements and brand partnerships on many of their videos. They sell “Eamon & Bec” merchandise through their website as well, and they host a podcast called Reroot with Eamon + Bec, In addition to their YouTube-centric ventures, the couple founded the tea brand, Chaiwala, together.

The two also own a cabin together in Ontario, Canada. Article continues below advertisement Eamon & Bec YouTube Video Creators and the Founders of Chaiwala Net worth: ~$500,000-$1.5 million Eamon Fitzgerald and Rebecca “Bec” Moroney are a Toronto-based couple who rose to fame when they began sharing videos from their converted Sprinter Van, Trinity.

In addition to the revenue from their videos, advertisements, and their line of merchandise, the pair also operates a tea business, Chaiwala. Joined YouTube: 2014 Subscriber Count: 941,000 New YouTube Posts: Every Sunday

What business does Eamon and Bec own?

Hi, we’re Eamon & Bec, the founders of Chaiwala. – After meeting at our corporate grown up jobs in Toronto, Ontario in 2012, we spent a few years abroad working and traveling. We shared each other’s zest for adventure and exploration and worked hard throughout our travels to learn as much as we could from each experience and interaction.

Our journey with Chaiwala chai began when we came to manage an independently owned cafe in Melbourne, Australia. The coffee culture in Australia is incredible and we immersed ourselves in all aspects of the shop – from speciality coffee to ethically sourced tea. This was the first place we learned that chai didn’t have to be a Starbucks syrup and that it was (and should always be) freshly prepared from whole spices, tea and ginger root.

Following our stint at the cafe, we packed our backpacks and headed to Nepal and India. Here our love of chai grew. We drank chai from local Chaiwalas (tea makers) who each added their own secret spice to perfect their recipes. Chai is so much more than a beverage it’s a ritual.

As such, chai quickly became an important part of our day. Upon returning home to Canada, Eamon began working as a barista at a local Toronto cafe. The owners cared immensely about their coffee but tea was just an after thought. So, Eamon went home to his mom’s kitchen with a bunch of spices and starting cracking, blending and taste testing.

Chaiwala chai was born.

Where is Pencil lake?

We are excited to announce the launch of the beta version of the new Ontario Trails Council website! Please take a moment to check out the updated version of this page. Pencil Lake Trail Pencil Lake sits off Highway 507, north of Buckhorn, south of Gooderham, in the middle of the Haliburton Highlands.

It is on southern edge of the Algonquin Dome, below the Algonquin Park boundary. It’s the feeder lake to the Trent Severn waterway, which drains into Lake Ontario, It’s not accessible by boat from the waterway, a popular boating system consisting of lakes, rivers and canals that traverses the province from eastern Lake Ontario to Georgian Bay to the west.

It’s about a three hour drive from Toronto, on routes that wend their way through some of the most beautiful countryside in Canada. The roads travel up and down gentle rolling hills and cut through farm land, forests, fens, bogs, marshes and beautiful rolling hills. Ontario Trails do not own or manage any trails. Check with the identified manager before using this trail. Do not trespass, allowed uses only. For more information on the great sport of snowshoeing please see our partner Snowshoe Canada

See also:  CóMo Obtener Una Beca En La Cun?

Can you swim in Big Rideau Lake?

Prepared by: Sarah MacLeod-Neilson, Surface Water Quality Co-ordinator, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority – Surface water quality conditions in Big Rideau Lake are monitored by the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority’s (RVCA) Watershed Watch program.

  • Watershed Watch samples several watershed lakes to assess nutrient concentrations, water clarity, dissolved oxygen availability, bacterial counts ( Escherichia coli ) and pH.
  • The collected data is summarized using the Canadian Council of Minister’s of the Environment’s Water Quality Index (CCME WQI).

Each parameter is evaluated against established guidelines to determine water quality conditions. Data from four deep point sites has been used to calculate the WQI rating for Big Rideau Lake, which was determined to be “FAIR” (2008-2013). The lake is monitored four times each year from May-October.

  1. Relatively few nutrient exceedances, good oxygen conditions for fish habitat, clear water and rarely elevated pH levels or bacterial counts characterize the water quality in Big Rideau Lake.
  2. The following will discuss how each of the above parameters factors into the lake’s water quality.
  3. For details on water quality monitoring locations and results please refer to the Rideau Lakes Subwatershed report ( https://watersheds.rvca.ca/subwatersheds/rideau-lakes/catchment-reports-rideau-lakes ).

Nutrients Total phosphorus (TP) is used as a primary indicator of excessive nutrient loading to the lake; when present in high concentrations it may contribute to abundant aquatic vegetation growth and depleted dissolved oxygen levels. Total phosphorus is an essential nutrient for aquatic plant and algae growth, it is usually found in limited supply in surface water.

The Provincial Water Quality Objective (PWQO) is used as the TP Guideline and states that in lakes concentrations greater than 0.020 mg/l indicate an excessive amount of TP within the water column, and may lead to abundant algae and/or aquatic plant growth. TP is found naturally in aquatic sediments and accumulates as plants die off and decompose; releasing nutrients back to the environment.

However, it may become abundant through contributions from both point and non-point sources including: runoff from fertilizers, failing septic systems, manure, phosphate detergents, storm water outfalls, carried in eroding sediments, atmospheric deposition and water treatment works.

  • Total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) is also used as an indicator of nutrients found in the aquatic environment and includes two forms of nitrogen; ammonia and organic nitrogen.
  • These forms of nitrogen are not readily available for plant uptake.
  • However, when a natural process of oxidation occurs they are converted to a form readily available for use by plants.

RVCA uses a guideline of 0.500 mg/l to assess TKN within surface waters. Nitrogen enters surface water through many of the same sources as TP. Within Big Rideau Lake nutrient concentrations generally meet guidelines, apart from some near shore areas. For more information on water quality results and monitored sites please refer to the Catchment Reports available here: https://watersheds.rvca.ca/subwatersheds/rideau-lakes/catchment-reports-rideau-lakes,

  • Sites with particularly high results should be further investigated to determine if sources of nutrient inputs can be reduced; such as the diversion of runoff (overland and storm water) and enhanced shoreline buffers.
  • Areas where high concentrations of nutrients are persistent may observe excessive aquatic plant growth, algae blooms and depleted oxygen concentrations.

Nutrient exceedances may be partially attributed to the natural aging of a lake, but can be slowed with the help of all lake residents by reducing nutrient inputs through practices such as proper maintenance of septic systems, keeping shorelines natural and using phosphate free soaps and detergents.

Water Clarity Water clarity is measured using a Secchi disk; a 30 cm disk marked into black and white quadrants and lowered on a line into the water column until it can no longer be seen (Figure 1). These measurements are taken at the deep points. It should be noted that Secchi depths in many waterbodies have been influenced by the colonization of zebra mussels resulting in clearer waters than may have been seen prior to the introduction of this species.

Collected data indicates that waters are very clear and sufficient sunlight can penetrate the water column to support aquatic life (photosynthesis) and sufficient visibility for safe recreational use (i.e. boating, swimming). Habitat Two other factors, dissolved oxygen/temperature and pH are also assessed to provide an overall sense of the health of Big Rideau Lake from a fish habitat perspective.

Dissolved Oxygen and Temperature Dissolved oxygen and temperature measurements are taken at 1m-2m increments at monitored deep points from surface to bottom to examine habitat conditions for water and cool water fish species. Suitable conditions for warm water fish species are determined by temperatures less than 25°C and dissolved oxygen greater than 4mg/l.

Suitable oxygen/temperature conditions over depths ranging 18-33 m. Optimal conditions for lake trout habitat are determined by temperature less than 10°C and dissolved oxygen greater than 7 mg/l. Spring and early summer typically have good conditions for lake trout habitat but as temperatures warm throughout the summer available habitat becomes more limited, particularly in the upper portions of the water column.

PH pH is a basic water quality parameter used to assess the acidity of water, an important factor for aquatic life. The Provincial Water Quality Objective (PWQO) advices that the pH of surface waters should be between 6.5 and 8.5 to protect aquatic life and prevent irritation for anyone using the waters for recreational purposes.

In some areas of the Rideau Lakes Watershed, surface waters tend to be a bit more alkaline (higher pH) which can generally be attributed to geology rather than anthropogenic activities; biological activities such as photosynthesis may also affect pH.

Overall the water chemistry data at the deep points describes good habitat conditions for warm and cold water fish species. There is some evidence that the warming of the water column in the late summer/early fall may limit the amount of habitat for sensitive cold water species such as lake trout. pH conditions are typically within the range recommended for the protection of aquatic life, indicating a healthy environment for aquatic species.

Escherichia coli Escherichia coli (E. coli ) counts are used as an indicator of bacterial contamination by fecal material which can contain harmful pathogens; results may be used to assess the suitability of surface water for recreational use.E. coli is sampled at monitored shoreline sites twice each sampling season.

  1. The results from collected data provide evidence that bacterial contamination is not a significant concern in Big Rideau Lake and the water should be safe for recreational use such as swimming and boating activities.
  2. Summary Overall, the water quality conditions in Big Rideau Lake generally meet established guidelines.

In some areas, nutrient concentrations are a continued concern. It is important that nutrient loading is minimized wherever possible to protect from deterioration in the lake environment as well as the wildlife and human populations it supports. Big Rideau Lake is an important part of the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem for a variety of organisms; it is also an important feature within the community, providing recreational opportunities, beauty and an economic resource.

What is the big lake in Canada called?

1. Lake Superior : 82,100 km2.2. Lake Huron: 59,600 km2.

Can you swim in the Rideau River?

Swimming – The Main Beach, a sandy beach on the Rideau River, is located next to the campground. The swimming area is marked with buoys and has a gradual drop-off. Please note: there are no lifeguards posted at the beaches. Amenities include picnic tables and a picnic shelter in the shady, grassy area. Flush toilets and change rooms are on site as well.

What lives in the Rideau River?

Your location: Rideau Canal Home Page > Ecology of the Rideau > Fauna of the Rideau Loons in Hoggs Bay, Big Rideau Lake The Rideau spans a wide variety of ecosystems, due in part to the underlying geology and man’s activity in the last 200 years. The Frontenac Axis, a section of the Canadian Shield (Precambrian rocks – very old) underlies the Rideau from Kingston Mills to Lower Rideau Lake.

These hard rocks form rugged topography (hills, ravines), including the basins for the lakes on the system. Most of the lakes are underlain by crystalline limestone which acts as a buffer against acid rain (hence the lakes are very productive for fish and other aquatic life). Outside of the Frontenac Axis, younger (Palaeozoic) flat lying sedimentary rocks form the underlying bedrock (it is from these rocks that the stones for the dams and locks were quarried).

The area has been actively logged since before the canal was built, the entire area cut over several times. Most of the region (including many of the islands in the lakes) was farmed or used for cattle pasture at one time. By the early 20th century, small farms on poor Frontenac Axis lands were being abandoned in favour of better (more productive) pastures.

So today, along the Rideau you’ll find forested areas (some now 100 years mature), active farmland, scrubland and abandoned farmland, low density cottage/summer home developed (rural) land and urban land. The forests are generally mixed, deciduous trees (oak, maple, ash, basswood, birch, elm) and conifer trees (most commonly white pine, white spruce and cedar).

On flat lying topography you’ll find cedar swamps, hardwood (black ash & silver maple) swamps, and bogs. Along the margins of the Rideau Canal you’ll find cattail marshes. All these areas support a varied and healthy wildlife population. The following is a list of the most common wildlife that you might spot on your Rideau journey.

Common Loon On all the lakes plus parts of the rivers, this bird is distinctive for its haunting call. It’s a diving bird, swimming underwater to catch fish Great Blue Heron Along the entire Rideau, a large bird usually seen wading near shore. If you see a white one, it’s an American Egret.

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Green Heron Most commonly in the shallow water sections (Colonel By Lake, River Styx, Rideau River) this is a small heron. Usually seen perched in a tree. Canada Goose Yes, we have these on the Rideau (more each year)

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Mallard duck These ducks quack when flushed. The male has a distinctive green head Common Merganser duck This duck has a pointed red bill – the male has a dark green head, the female a brown head

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Hooded Merganser Most often seen in spring on the Rideau Pied-billed Grebe A small diving bird

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Ring-billed Gull A gull with mark on bill Caspian Tern The Caspian Tern, a large white tern with dark orange bill, the Common Tern, a somewhat smaller tern and the Black Tern, small tern with black body (adult)

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Trumpeter Swans An extirpated native species in this region, they were re-introduced in the 1990s. Favourite haunts include Opinicon Lake and Big Rideau Lake (near Narrows and Portland).

Other Birds (can be found in the near-water environment) There are many other types of birds that you might spot in the near-water environment; red-tailed hawks, red-winged blackbirds, turkey vultures, turkeys, ruffed grouse and many more (bring along your bird book). A few are shown below.

Ospreys Now common along the Rideau – often spotted in their large nest made of sticks perched high in a pine tree or a power line stanchion. It dives to catch fish (quite spectacular to see) Belted Kingfisher A very skittish bird – you’ll most likely see it flying away from you.

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Turkey Vulture Can often be seen sitting in the top of a dead tree Wild Turkeys Yes, wild turkeys can indeed fly.

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Ruffed Grouse This well camouflaged bird, usually found foraging on the ground, takes off with rapid wing motion when flushed. Pileated Woodpecker A large woodpecker – you’ll hear it pounding away at a tree.

Reptiles and Amphibians We’ve got a healthy population of reptiles and amphibians including turtles, the most likely to be seen are the Common Map Turtle, Common Snapping Turtle, and Midland Painted Turtle. There also three other less commonly seen turtles, the Stinkpot Turtle (aka Musk Turtle) a small turtle found in areas with aquatic plant growth; Blanding’s Turtle with a “war helmet” type shell and bright yellow chin and throat, usually found in wetlands and the Spotted Turtle, a small turtle with bright yellow spots on its shell, usually found in areas with aquatic plants and a silt bottom.

  1. We’ve got lots of frogs that will provide you with a nightly serenade.
  2. The two biggest are the bullfrog and the green frog.
  3. Also the leopard frog, spring peeper and many others.
  4. We’ve also got snakes, but not any poisonous ones.
  5. The two largest snakes are the Northern Water Snake and the Black Rat Snake – both generally found near water.

The common garter snake can also be found throughout the region. We’ve also got salamanders, mudpuppies and skinks.

Common Map Turtle These turtles have a peaked shell and yellow-orange lines on the skin and shell Midland Painted Turtle These turtles have a rounded smooth shell with bright red splotches along the edge

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Sunning Turtles You’ll most commonly see turtles sunning themselves on rocks or logs. Here we see one painted turtle (middle left) and three map turtles (peaked shell and not as colourful as the painted turtle) Eastern Snapping Turtle The Snapping turtle almost always stays in the water, you’ll find it floating or slowly swimming near marshy areas.

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Northern Leopard Frog A common frog found in the near water and meadow/pond environment American Bullfrog One of the most common frogs on the Rideau. We also have the Green Frog which is similar, but slightly smaller with a dorsal fold down the back. The bullfrog has a dorsal fold that only wraps around the ear.

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Northern Water Snake A fairly large (up to 4 feet) non-venomous snake found in the near-water environment. Black Rat Snake The largest snake on the Rideau (in fact, the largest snake in Canada – up to 8 feet), this non-venomous snake prefers near-water wooded areas. It has the ability to climb trees.

Mammals In the near shore environment you’ll likely spot muskrats and beavers. You may even spot the somewhat reclusive river otter (found in the lakes here as well as rivers). And there are the usual Eastern Ontario mammals to be sometimes found near the water: raccoons, black, grey and red squirrels, chipmunks, foxes, coyotes, white-tailed deer, porcupines and skunks.

Muskrat Most often seen swimming near shore. It has a thin bare tail. Beaver You’ll usually spot a dam or lodge made of sticks before you see the beaver. Has a broad flat tail that it slaps the water with when disturbed.

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American Mink Often seen foraging near shore. River Otter These tend to be somewhat reclusive and are usually found as a family grouping. They present a characteristic inquisitive “heads-up” in the water.

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Raccoons These usually forage at night, but can sometimes be spotted during the day. White Tailed Deer (fawn) There are large populations on these along the Rideau. The young fawns have a spotted coat.

Fish The Rideau is home to healthy populations of many fish species. The lakes and most of the rivers are home to species such as Large Mouth Bass, Small Mouth Bass, Northern Pike and Crappie. Lake Trout are present in some lakes that have depths in excess of 80 ft / 24 m (i.e.

How deep is Rideau River?

The Rideau Canal FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) www.rideau-info.com/canal/rideau-faq.html ABOUT THE RIDEAU CANAL What is the Rideau Canal? The Rideau Canal is a series of rivers, lakes and connecting locks and canals that form a continuous waterway from Kingston to Ottawa, in eastern Ontario, Canada.

  1. It is 202 kilometres (125 miles) long, of which about 19 kilometres (12 miles) is man made (locks and canal cuts), the rest are natural waters.
  2. There are 45 locks in 23 lockstations along the main route of the Rideau plus 2 locks that link the Tay Canal to the Rideau.
  3. From Lake Ontario at Kingston the canal rises 50.6 metres (166.2 feet) to the summit of Upper Rideau Lake and then descends 83.8 metres (275 feet) to the Ottawa River at Ottawa.

Water depths range from 1.5 metres (5 feet) to 90 metres (300 feet). To view location maps, head over to: www.rideau-info.com/canal/maps.html ( click this link ). Who Operates the Rideau Canal? The Rideau is operated as a recreational waterway by the Parks Canada Agency, which is under the authority of the Canadian government Department of Environment.

  1. Parks Canada maintains the heritage aspects of the canal and operates it much like a park.
  2. When and why was it built? It was built between 1826 and 1832.
  3. It pre-dates the locks on the St.
  4. Lawrence, and was built to assist the defence of Canada by allowing boats to travel from Montreal to the Great Lakes without having to travel down the St.

Lawrence, in gunshot range of the Americans. It was officially opened in May 1832 and has been operated continuously ever since. Who built it? It was built by the British under the direction of Lt. Colonel John By of the Royal Engineers. Private contractors, such as John Redpath and Thomas McKay, did most of the actual construction.

The design and engineering of the canal was done by Colonel By and the Royal Engineers. Two companies of Royal Sappers and Miners assisted in the construction. Hundreds of tradesmen (i.e. masons, carpenters, smiths, coopers) used local materials to fashion the locks and dams. The large amount of manual labour (i.e.

digging & moving dirt, chopping trees, excavating stones) was done by hundreds of immigrant Irish and French-Canadian labourers. Local settlers assisted with moving materials (i.e. stones) and providing food to the construction camps. Some 2,500 to 4,000 men worked on the construction each year.

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Many women and children were also part of these construction camps. For details about the construction, visit the History of the Rideau Canal webpage at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/history/ ( click this link ). What makes the Rideau Canal unique? It is the oldest continuously operated canal in North America.

Most of the locks are still operated by hand, using the same mechanisms that were used to operate the locks in 1832. As you travel the Rideau, you are viewing living history. The Rideau isn’t just a canal cut (only 10% is man-made), it’s a waterway combining canals, rivers and lakes.

  • This makes the Rideau a wonderful blend of urban, rural and natural landscapes.
  • You can see million dollar homes, quaint cottages, and loons swimming in a sheltered, undisturbed bay, all in the same day.
  • How has the Rideau been recognized? On May 15, 1925 the Rideau Canal was designated a National Historic Site of Canada,

It was re-designated with exanded reasons in 1967 and again in 2011. For the history of the Rideau’s National Historic Site designations see the: Rideau NHS page, The 2011 designation wording is:

  • built between 1826 and 1832, it is the best preserved canal from the great canal-building era in North America that is still fully operational: its historic structures and environment speak to its ingenious design, construction, and military purpose, as well as to its social and economic functions;
  • it exemplifies cutting edge canal design due to Lieutenant-Colonel John By’s innovative “slackwater” approach, which created a navigable route from natural waterways and lakes on a scale previously unseen in North America, and because it was one of the first canals in the world engineered specifically for steam-powered vessels;
  • its construction through more than 200 kilometers of bush, swamps, and lakes was a monumental feat. Each year, as many as 5,000-6,000 workmen assembled at over two-dozen worksites. The great majority of the labourers were Irish and French Canadian toiling under the supervision of contractors and the Royal Engineers. Working primarily with hand tools and in extremely difficult and dangerous conditions, these labourers and skilled craftsmen, such as Scottish stonemasons, endured disease and injury, with large numbers dying during the canal’s construction;
  • in the aftermath of the War of 1812, when relations with the United States were tense, it was built to serve as a military canal and represented a fundamental component of Britain’s defences in the interior of North America, safeguarding the supply lines between Montréal and Lake Ontario by providing an alternative and more defensible route to that along the St. Lawrence River;
  • it contributed significantly to the social and economic development of Upper Canada / Ontario prior to 1850, when it was a key artery for the movement of goods and people in and out of the colony. After that time, it continued to be of local commercial importance until the 1930s; since then it has served as a popular recreational route.”

In 2000 the Rideau Waterway was designated a Canadian Heritage River in recognition of its outstanding historical and recreational values. In 2007 it was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site recognizing it as a work of human creative genius. Two criteria were used as the basis for the designation:

  1. The Rideau Canal remains the best preserved example of a slackwater canal in North America demonstrating the use of European slackwater technology in North America on a large scale. It is the only canal dating from the great North American canal-building era of the early 19th century that remains operational along its original line with most of its original structures intact (UNESCO Criterion i)
  2. The Rideau Canal is an extensive, well preserved and significant example of a canal which was used for a military purposes linked to a significant stage in human history – that of the fight to control North America (UNESCO Criterion iv)

BOATING THE RIDEAU CANAL How big a boat do I need? There is no minimum size of boat. The locks are operated for the tourist boater so the canal staff are used to handling any type of boat whether it be a canoe, kayak, PWC, runabout or cruiser. What are boat size restrictions? The maximum size of boat is 27.4m/90ft.

Length, 7.9m/26ft. width, 6.7m/22ft height. Under special circumstances, the Rideau Canal can accommodate a boat up to 33.5m (110ft) long by 9.1m (30ft) in width. The navigation channel, which is clearly marked by buoys, maintains at least 1.5 metres (5 feet) of water under normal circumstances (the deepest part is in Big Rideau Lake, which reaches a depth of 100.3 metres (329 feet)).

Parks Canada asks that any boat drafting more than 1.2 metres (4 feet) to contact them before entering the canal. Minimum fixed bridge clearance is 6.7 metres (22 feet). Is the Rideau Canal difficult to boat? No – it’s very easy. The Rideau was built as a “slackwater” system, meaning there is no excessive current in the rivers.

Waves with some chop can develop on the bigger lakes but boaters can easily seek shelter near shore. Each lock has 3 or 4 canal staff who are used to dealing with novice boaters and will help out in any way they can. Should I carry a navigation chart? Yes – there are two sets of navigation charts that cover the Rideau.

Chart 1512 covers from Ottawa to Smiths Falls and Chart 1513 covers Smiths Falls to Kingston. These charts, in addition to showing the depth of the water in all the lakes and rivers, clearly show the navigation channel and all the marker buoys. Charts may be purchased at many of the lockstations (see Lockstation Services Chart for locations) or can be ordered from World of Maps.

  • See: www.worldofmaps.com,
  • When is the Rideau Canal open for boating? The locks operate from mid-May to mid-October.
  • For exact dates see the fees & schedules page located at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/fees.html ( click this link ).
  • Of course with so many sections of natural water, you can boat anytime there is open water.

Most of the lakes have launch ramp access. The longest “lock-free” stretch is the Long Reach, between Burritts Rapids and Long Island, stretching for 40 kilometres (25 miles) along the Rideau River. Do the locks operate 24 hours a day? No – the hours vary.

  • During most of the season the locks open at 9:00 am (10 am during weekdays in the spring and fall).
  • In the summer they stay open until 6:00 pm from Monday to Thursday and 7:00 pm from Friday to Sunday.
  • In spring and fall they generally close at 4:00 pm on weekdays and 5:00 pm on weekends.
  • For full details see the fees & schedules page at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/fees.html ( click this link ).

How long does it take to boat the Rideau Canal? A one way trip can be done by a powerboat in as little as 4 days, but in reality you should plan at least 6 days each way. A general rule of thumb is to assume 30 minutes for each lock* and an average speed of 10 kph.

  • So, with 202 km and 45 locks, that’s 43 hours of travel time to get you from Lake Ontario to the Ottawa River.
  • In summer, the lockstations are open 9 hours a day – so that’s 4.8 days.
  • Presumably you’ll want some additional time to sightsee, shop, swim, fish, etc.
  • So, look at the maps, figure out where you want to go, and do the math.

Don’t rush, give yourself plenty of time to enjoy the scenery and relax. * Locks are like stoplights – you might get a green, the lock doors open ready to accept you. In that case the trip through a lock takes about 15 minutes. But you can also get a red, the worst case is if the lock doors just closed before your arrival and you’ll have to wait for a full lockage cycle before you can get locked through.

  1. That might take 45 minutes for a single lock.
  2. Time also depends on how many boats are locking through with you and how deep the lock is.
  3. Hence an average of about 30 minutes per lock.
  4. How much does it cost to go through the locks? Lock fees are based on the length of your boat and the type of pass you wish to obtain.

For instance, with a 20 foot boat, it would cost you $18.40 for a single lockage and return (based on the 2023 rate of $1.00 per foot). A season pass (unlimited lockage) would cost $190.00 for that same 20 foot boat (based on the 2023 rate of $9.50 per foot).

  1. For full fee information visit: www.rideau-info.com/canal/fees.html ( click this link ).
  2. I’m in a small boat with no sleeping quarters – where can I overnight? If you bring a tent, you can camp at most of the lockstations (a mooring permit gives you camping privileges) except for Ottawa, Hogs Back, Old Slys and Smiths Fall Combined where camping is not allowed.

Parks Canada also has oTENTiks at a few lockstations (Upper Brewers, Upper Beveridges & Upper Nicholsons). There are also many B&Bs, Inns, and Lodges located along the shores of the Rideau that will allow you to dock your boat and stay at their place.

  1. Call ahead for reservations.
  2. For listings, check the accommodations page at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/accommodations.html ( click this link ).
  3. I’m in a big self-contained boat – where can I overnight? You have many options.
  4. You can anchor your boat in one of the many sheltered bays.
  5. You can moor at most of the lockstations for a reasonable mooring fee.

For those wishing more services such as shore power and showers, most marinas offer dockage with these services to transient boaters. Have a look at the marinas page at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/marinas.html ( click this link ). Can I consume alcohol or cannabis (marijuana) on my boat? No with one exception.

The law in Ontario regarding alcohol and cannabis in any vessel (including canoes and kayaks) is the same as it is for a motor vehicle. If you’re found to be impaired, your driver’s licence will be automatically suspended for 90 days and you’ll be subject to impaired “driving” penalties. Any liquor in a boat must be in a container that is unopened and the seal unbroken; or stored in a closed compartment out of reach of the pilot of the vessel.

Cannabis must be in a closed or fastened container out of the reach of the pilot. The exception is for a vessel with a fixed head (built in bathroom), fixed cooking facilities and fixed sleeping berths. You can consume alcohol and cannabis (subject to Parks Canada regulations) on such a vessel if it is properly moored at a dock or at anchor.

  • Do I need to wear a Lifejacket? Yes and no.
  • YES if you are using an inflatable PDF (either auto or manual inflate) in any open boat or on the deck or open cockpit of a larger boat.
  • In those cases an inflatable PFD MUST BE WORN (the OPP is enforcing this rule).
  • This rule applies to any open boat, power or paddle.

NO if you have a regular Canadian approved PFD/Lifejacket, of appropriate size, for everyone on board. If not worn, the PDF/Lifejacket must be readily accessible (not buried inside a sealed hatch). Do I have to stock up on gas and supplies? No – there are many services available along the Rideau.

  1. There are lots of marinas so it’s easy to get fuel.
  2. There are several communities along the Rideau that have grocery stores within easy walking distance of a docking area so you can stock up on food, ice, drinks, etc.
  3. You’ll find links to many of the towns, with maps and a listing of services from the maps page at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/maps.html ( click this link ).

I’m trailering a boat – where can I put in? There are many boat launches along the Rideau, some maintained by local communities, some at lock stations, some at the provincial parks, some at campgrounds and at most local marinas. A full list of boat launches can be found at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/boat-launch.html ( click this link ).

  • If you wish to boat for several days and wish a secure spot to leave your vehicle and trailer, then a marina or a campground is the best option.
  • Most offer well maintained launch ramps, accessible for a nominal fee.
  • It is best to give them a call in advance, to get the details about storage for your vehicle and trailer while you are enjoying your Rideau trip.

Have a look at the campgrounds page: www.rideau-info.com/canal/accom-camp.html ( click this link )or the marinas page: www.rideau-info.com/canal/marinas.html ( click this link ) Can I rent a boat? Yes – there are a number of options. Those wishing to cruise the waterway may wish to rent a houseboat or a cruiser.

Those just interested in a day trip can rent a pontoon boat from one of the local marinas. Several of the local lodges, Inns and B&Bs also offer boat rentals as part of their services. A listing of rentals and tours can be found on the boat rentals and tours page at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/boat_rent.html ( click this link ).

LAND BASED VISITORS Do I need a boat to enjoy the Rideau? No – the locks are very pleasant places for visitors by car or foot to visit. Nice lawns with picnic tables make a great place to enjoy a quiet lunch. The towns and villages along the Rideau offer lots of opportunities for sightseeing and shopping.

Those interested in coming by vehicle should have a look at the driving tours pages: www.rideau-info.com/canal/driving/ ( click this link ). Is there a charge for using the lockstations? Several of the lockstations have a nominal charge for parking ($1 to $4 per day). There is no charge for family/individual day use of lockstation facilities although donations are appreciated.

A full listing of fees can be found on the fees and schedules page at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/fees.html ( click this link ). Can I camp at the locks? Yes, but only if you arrive by bicycle or are hiking the recognized hiking trails. Campin is available at all lockstations except for Ottawa, Hog Back, Old Slys and Smiths Falls Combined.

Those arriving by water have access to one camping site with the purchase of a mooring permit. Those arriving by bicycle, on foot, or by a boat that can be pulled from the water (i.e. canoe/kayak) may purchase a camping permit. Those travelling by vehicle (car, RV, etc.) cannot stay overnight at the locks unless renting an oTENTik.

The lockstations offers lawns to pitch a tent, picnic tables, water, washroom facilities and some have metal BBQ stands. There are no showers except for lockstations that offer oTENTiks (available to anyone with paid access to the Rideau Canal – lock pass, mooring pass or camping pass).

A table showing the facilities offered by each of the lockstations can be found at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/lock-services.html ( click this link ) and a camping FAQ can be found at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/lock-camping.html ( click this link ) If I come by car or RV, where can I overnight? There are lots of accommodations along the Rideau – B&Bs, Inns, Campgrounds, Cottages, etc.

– take your pick. Some of these are listed on the accommodations page at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/accommodations.html ( click this link ). How can I get out on the water if I come by land? You can take a boat with you (trailer, cartop, inflatable, canoe, kayak), rent a boat on-site, or take a boat tour.

  1. Information about boat rentals and tours can be found on the boat rentals and tours page at: www.rideau-info.com/canal/boat_rent.html ( click this link ).
  2. CONTACTS Parks Canada Agency Rideau Canal Office 34 Beckwith St.
  3. South, Smiths Falls, ON K7A 2A8 Tel: 613-283-5170 Toll Free: 1-888-773-8888 Fax: 613-283-0677 [email protected] website: www.pc.gc.ca/rideaucanal( click this link ).

Friends of the Rideau P.O. Box 1232 Smiths Falls, ON K7A 5C7 email: [email protected] website: www.rideaufriends.com ( click this link ). FAQ compiled by: Ken Watson Date Created: September 15, 1999 Date Updated: January 28, 2023

Is Bob really Eamon’s dad?

Episodes –

Welcome to REROOT with Eamon and Bec! In today’s episode, we welcome Sydney Ferbrache, a Solo Female Van-lifer, Podcast Host, and Dog Mom. Today we discuss the story of how Sydney found van-life through an Instagram post, now years later, she is still living full-time in the van blogging and podcasting throughout her adventures. We touch on her new coffee business, future plans of travel, and we reveal some of our most obnoxious poop stories. Reroot is about blurring the lines between hustler and hippie. Delving into the tipping point of change that reroutes your life and the story of what happens next. Chronicling tales of entrepreneurs, artists, creators, and anyone else leaving their mark on the world. Welcome to REROOT with Eamon and Bec! PILLOWTALK continues in this week’s episode, a series in which we speak openly and candidly about what’s on our mind – in the comfort of our bed. This week we discuss, Home Renovations Plans, Fostering Animals, Future Of Podcast, Being A Server, The Darkside Of Youtube, Travel Plans & The Pandemic. Reroot is about blurring the lines between hustler and hippie. Delving into the tipping point of change that reroutes your life and the story of what happens next. Chronicling tales of entrepreneurs, artists, creators, and anyone else leaving their mark on the world. Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube: http://bit.ly/3cefKvW Instagram: https://bit.ly/2NygyS5 Producer Colin: YouTube: http://bit.ly/2NArgYJ Missing episodes? Click here to refresh the feed. Welcome to REROOT with Eamon and Bec! In today’s episode we welcome Steve and Dave from Happy Pear. The Happy Pear started out back in 2004 with a dream of helping people to live healthier and happier lives! Happy Pear now has a community of over 1 million people living healthier. Today we discuss their ventures into the business of happy pear, becoming plant-based, life as a twin, community, building a brand, and being authentic with yourself. Reroot is a podcast about blurring the lines between hustler and hippie. Delving into the tipping point of change that reroutes your life and the story of what happens next. Chronicling tales of entrepreneurs, artists, creators, and anyone else leaving their mark on the world. Welcome to REROOT with Eamon and Bec! In today’s episode, we welcome Tyler and Todd, a Canadian YouTube couple living Van Life and now living in the woods building an off-grid cabin. Today we discuss the story of how Tyler and Todd met, the process of coming out, their entrepreneurial endeavor into real-estate and house flipping, as well as their adventure into YouTube and the challenges this far. Reroot is about blurring the lines between hustler and hippie. Delving into the tipping point of change that reroutes your life and the story of what happens next. Chronicling tales of entrepreneurs, artists, creators, and anyone else leaving their mark on the world. Welcome to REROOT with Eamon and Bec! Reroot is about blurring the lines between hustler and hippie. Delving into the tipping point of change that reroutes your life and the story of what happens next. Chronicling tales of entrepreneurs, artists, creators, and anyone else leaving their mark on the world. In today’s episode, we welcome our dear friend Life With Lee. Lee opens up about her mental health journey and struggles with depression. From breaking off a long-term relationship and stopping van life, to the present and everything in between. Lee’s story is one of introspection, deeply personal work, self-care, and owning your shadows. Welcome to REROOT with Eamon and Bec! In today’s episode, we welcome YouTube Sensations and Travel Vloggers – Kara And Nate. A couple of high school sweethearts who have made our dream of long-term travel a reality, they have been traveling the world full-time for the last four years documenting their daily adventures. Reroot is about blurring the lines between hustler and hippie. Delving into the tipping point of change that reroutes your life and the story of what happens next. Chronicling tales of entrepreneurs, artists, creators, and anyone else leaving their mark on the world. Kara & Nate YouTube: http://bit.ly/2MebC4J Instagram: https://bit.ly/3uuNign Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube: http://bit.ly/3cefKvW Instagram: https://bit.ly/2NygyS5 Welcome to REROOT with Eamon and Bec! If you are new here – Reroot is about blurring the lines between hustler and hippie. Delving into the tipping point of change that reroutes your life and the story of what happens next. Today’s episode is a continuation of Part 1 of of our “Assumptions” podcast episode, We asked you guys about what weird assumptions you guys have about us, and we spill it all. In this episode, we discuss things like Eamon is always naked, his obsession over his underwear, how they traveled the world, Farts. and Bec’s emotionality, Enjoy! Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube: http://bit.ly/3cefKvW Instagram: https://bit.ly/2NygyS5 Welcome to REROOT with Eamon and Bec! If you are new here – Reroot is about blurring the lines between hustler and hippie. Delving into the tipping point of change that reroutes your life and the story of what happens next. Chronicling tales of entrepreneurs, artists, creators, and anyone else leaving their mark on the world. Today’s episode is a combination of weird assumptions you guys have about us. We asked on Instagram, you brought the heat and we are going to spill it all. Enjoy! Welcome back to REROOT with Eamon and Bec! We are so thrilled to be back. If you are new here – Reroot is about blurring the lines between hustler and hippie. Delving into the tipping point of change that reroutes your life and the story of what happens next. Chronicling tales of entrepreneurs, artists, creators, and anyone else leaving their mark on the world. In this week’s episode, in the spur of the moment fashion, we decided to grab our microphones and continue to record our conversation as we were while laying in bed. Thus, a new series called PILLOWTALK was born. Enjoy! Our cookbook is NOW available https://www.eamonandbec.com/ Veganuary: https://veganuary.com/ Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ Set goals with us on our Reroot Podcast Group!! Wishing everyone a Happy Holiday Season XX Our cookbook is NOW available https://www.eamonandbec.com/ Today we answer YOUR questions with Christian and Aubry aka The Matneys. Lots of interesting, intriguing, insightful answers 😉 Find The Matneys: Podcast https://apple.co/2RMxEc9 YouTube https://www.youtube.com/thematneys Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ Our cookbook is NOW available!! Shop it here https://www.eamonandbec.com/ Meetup details: When: 2:00PM on Saturday, December 8th Where: Chaiwala HQ (100 Bridgeland Ave, Unit 2B Toronto, ON) What: A fun afternoon potluck!! Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ A conversation with our friend Steve Ballantyne: founder and CEO of Station Cold Brew Coffee. We talk all things entrepreneurship, growing up as a Christian, and redefining what it means to be a man. Enjoy! Find Station Cold Brew Coffee: Website http://www.stationcoldbrew.com/ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/stationcoldbrew/ Find Steve: https://www.instagram.com/stevewballantyne/ Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ Lauren’s Nightmare Interview http://bit.ly/2PRMYqk Lauren Toyota is someone we have looked up to for many years. She runs two successful YouTube channels and is at the forefront of the vegan movement. We are so blessed to call her a friend. Follow Hot for Food YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/hotforfoodblog Blog: https://www.hotforfoodblog.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hotforfood/ Follow Lauren Toyota YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/toyotalauren Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/laurentoyota/ We’ve watched so many YouTubers go down the scary path of burning out and we’ve done our best to stay in a healthy state of mind. But with so many projects on the go at the moment, have we reached our breaking point? Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ A vulnerable conversation with Bob (Eamon’s Dad) about his entrepreneurial hardships, finding happiness through passion and why he changed his eating habits at 65 years old. Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ In follow up to last week’s episode, Bec takes a seat in the “Host Chair” to interview Eamon. They chat all things high school, growing up as a “troubled kid” and the women before Bec. Don’t forget to leave a review to win the deluxe gift set! Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ This week, Eamon takes a seat in the “Host Chair” to interview Bec. They chat all things religion, lies and just how often she uses Q Tips. Hope you enjoy this very fun and vulnerable conversation 🙂 Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ Today we sit down with Trent & Allie to chat about monetizing content through affiliate links, Patreon and Google Adsense. We also chat about how they view veganism as omnivores. Enjoy our conversation! ♡ Find Trent & Allie YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/trentallie Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/trentandallie/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trentandallie ♡ Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ Today we sit down with Matt & Danielle from the successful YouTube channel Exploring Alternatives. With over 500,000 subscribers these two are living (their version of) the dream. but it hasn’t always been so easy. Enjoy our conversation! ♡ Find Matt & Danielle YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/explorealternatives Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/exploringalternatives/?hl=en Website: https://www.exploringalternatives.ca/ ♡ Find Eamon & Bec: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/eamonbec Bec https://www.instagram.com/rebeccamoroney/ Eamon https://www.instagram.com/eh.mon/ Show more

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Where is Eamon and Bec cabin?

Who Are Eamon and Bec? – Eamon and Bec are Canadian business owners and content creators. They’ve been van lifers for over four years and have recently renovated a cabin in the woods of Ontario, Canada. You’ll find regular videos about their life and adventures on their popular YouTube channel. They also own a tea company called Chaiwala.

How old is Beck and Eamon?

First video Eamon & Bec is a Canadian YouTube channel consisting of a couple people, including Eamon Fitzgerald (age 28), and Rebecca ‘Bec’ Moroney (age 29). They make travel videos and they drive around the world in their self converted sprinter van.

Who owns Chai Wallah?

Muhummed ibrahim – Co-Founder – chaiiwala | LinkedIn.

Who owns Chaiwala tea?

Chaiwala USA was founded in 2018 by Sajida and Fuad Jacksi, a wife and husband team, who are passionate about sharing their love for chai with the world. Our signature chai blends are hand crafted using pure, high-quality ingredients necessary to make that perfect cup of chai.

Our chai reflects our heritage with influences from our Indian, African and Middle Eastern cultures. We use a robust black tea from East Africa, Sri Lanka and India as the base for all of our blends. Our spices are of the highest quality and ethically sourced from all over the world. Not only are our tea blends organic, vegan and non-gmo, they are hand-blended and packed locally in Long Island, NY.

The Karak Chai, our very first blend, is a perfect breakfast chai that boasts a strong, bold flavor. This classic blend, a combination of black tea and sweet cardamom, is a staple in homes across the Middle East and the Indian Subcontinent. The Spice Chai, our take on the traditional masala chai, is an exquisite combination of traditional aromatic Indian spices and rich black tea creating a brew that warms the soul.

  1. Spicy ginger and clove, sweet cardamom, cinnamon and star anise, mellowed by delicate notes of rose, create a blend that awakens the senses and lifts your mood.
  2. The Saffron Chai is a luxurious blend of our bold black tea infused with the sweet, earthy notes of vibrant red saffron and freshly ground cardamom.

This unique blend takes you on a journey of exotic flavors and aromas. Rose Chai, affectionately referred to as ‘gulabi chai’. It is a fragrant tea infused with rose petals and sweet cardamom. Rose tea has a host of health benefits accompanied by a naturally rich taste and an intoxicating floral aroma.

Where did Eamon and Bec meet?

IT HAS BEEN FAR TOO LONG!!! My last blog post was in December 2018?! Like what??!! That’s absolutely crazy. I promise I’m going to start updating this more. I have done so many amazing shoots since then that I love so so much, starting with this one! If you don’t already know Eamon & Bec, this beautiful couple lives their adventurous life in their van. What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On After talking with these two, I found out that we are actually from the same city and grew up in the same place but somehow ended up meeting in Mexico (and eventually Torontobut more on that later). Eamon & Bec met years ago at school, were friends for a long time before they dated and have since travelled the world together and tons of North America out of their hand-made tiny home on wheels.

And let me tell you, after I met them I considered moving into a van for a really long and hard minute. I still am! They were in the middle of travelling down Baja California and about to go over to mainland Mexico when I caught them for a day to hang out! We found this beautiful secluded beach where absolutely no one was.

They even ended up parking right on the beach to sleep there for the night! I can’t imagine how peaceful it was. So not only do they travel full-time but they also run their own Chai Tea company, make YouTube videos for living and still find time to make homemade vegan food every night as they are 100% vegan.

  • They cooked up the most amazing nachos with the most AMAZING vegan nacho cheese made from veggies.
  • I have made it tons and tons of times since then! I think it’s my favourite thing in the world to adventure to new and unknown locations with my couples.
  • We drove down a few dirt roads to find the right one that lead us here and it was so worth it.

So yes I will totally third wheel with y’all to a random place in the middle of mexico, down all the dirt roads between overgrown cactus farms and goof around and have fun. We ate tons of fruits and vegan nachos, we swam, splashed and played in the ocean, rolled in the sand and smiled so much our faces hurt. What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On

Where is Baum Lake located?

Tucked away in the hills near Burney, California, Baum Lake is perfect for a peaceful afternoon kayaking or canoeing. This calm lake is only open to non-motorized vessels, making it a perfect spot for human powered boating. A very gradual and wide dirt boat launch area makes launching vessels easy.

The longest paddling path on the lake leads to the dam straight ahead from the launch area. Along the lake a variety of birds can be spotted including pelicans, osprey, bald eagles, and many species of waterfowl. During some months chicks and fledglings can be observed following their mother. Baum Lake is owned and managed by Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which allows users free parking and recreation.

Several picnic tables sit near the lake’s edge under willow trees and provide great spots for picnicking before or after paddling. Nearby Crystal Lake is closed to boating, but it flows into Baum Lake via a very short outflow stream. A short hiking trail leads around the shore of Baum Lake and passes over the outflow from Crystal Lake.

This trail also is part of the Pacific Crest Trail. Excellent bird watching and fishing add other great opportunities for recreation. The best fishing is often found near the outflow from Crystal Lake into Baum Lake. Osprey can be observed fishing in the cold waters of the lake. These expert fishers hover in the air looking for fish before diving into the lake feet first.

Osprey’s well adapted vision can spot fish from over 130 feet above the surface. Crystal Lake Hatchery also lies along the shore of Baum Lake, and there several species of trout that are reared to be transported to near 60 locations in the Northern California area.

Where is Polly lake?

Polly Lake, Thunder Bay District, Ontario, Canada

Type: Lake – a large inland body of standing water
Region: Thunder Bay District, Ontario, Canada
Latitude: 49° 7′ 52′ N
Longitude: 88° 15′ 58′ W
Lat/Long (dec): 49.13124,-88.26628

Where is Pierre lake?

Four miles northeast of Orient in Colville National Forest. This is a year-round open season lake that has Largemouth Bass, Black Crappie, Kokanee, Rainbow Trout, and Westslope Cutthroat Trout available. The Forest Service campground has a boat launch.

Where is Eamon and Bec cabin located?

Where Do Eamon and Bec Live Now? – Eamon and Bec are now living at their cabin in Canada. While they traveled back to their van in Morocco after a year and half of the van sitting in an airport parking lot, they had to leave it again to tend to health issues. They have hopes of traveling in one of their vans periodically, but at this time, their cabin remains their home base.

Are Eamon and Bec Canadian?

Eamon & Bec is a Canadian YouTube channel consisting of a couple people, including Eamon Fitzgerald (age 28), and Rebecca ‘Bec’ Moroney (age 29). They make travel videos and they drive around the world in their self converted sprinter van.

Where did Eamon and Bec meet?

IT HAS BEEN FAR TOO LONG!!! My last blog post was in December 2018?! Like what??!! That’s absolutely crazy. I promise I’m going to start updating this more. I have done so many amazing shoots since then that I love so so much, starting with this one! If you don’t already know Eamon & Bec, this beautiful couple lives their adventurous life in their van. What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On After talking with these two, I found out that we are actually from the same city and grew up in the same place but somehow ended up meeting in Mexico (and eventually Torontobut more on that later). Eamon & Bec met years ago at school, were friends for a long time before they dated and have since travelled the world together and tons of North America out of their hand-made tiny home on wheels.

  • And let me tell you, after I met them I considered moving into a van for a really long and hard minute.
  • I still am! They were in the middle of travelling down Baja California and about to go over to mainland Mexico when I caught them for a day to hang out! We found this beautiful secluded beach where absolutely no one was.

They even ended up parking right on the beach to sleep there for the night! I can’t imagine how peaceful it was. So not only do they travel full-time but they also run their own Chai Tea company, make YouTube videos for living and still find time to make homemade vegan food every night as they are 100% vegan.

They cooked up the most amazing nachos with the most AMAZING vegan nacho cheese made from veggies. I have made it tons and tons of times since then! I think it’s my favourite thing in the world to adventure to new and unknown locations with my couples. We drove down a few dirt roads to find the right one that lead us here and it was so worth it.

So yes I will totally third wheel with y’all to a random place in the middle of mexico, down all the dirt roads between overgrown cactus farms and goof around and have fun. We ate tons of fruits and vegan nachos, we swam, splashed and played in the ocean, rolled in the sand and smiled so much our faces hurt. What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On What Lake Do Eamon And Bec Live On

Where do vanwives live in Canada?

With a pressurized water system, built-in thermostat and solar powered electrical — the 2006 Mercedes Sprinter Jazmyn Canning, 26, and Crystal Drinkwalter, 25, now call their home is hardly without its perks. But with just 92 square feet to share between them and their two Australian shepherds, Bella and Izzy, Canning says it can definitely feel “cozy.” The pair wouldn’t give it up, though, now one year into an adventure exploring places they’d never imagined. Just inside the van’s door is the couple’s kitchen and pantry. On either side, the driving quarters and the living/sleeping area. (Submitted by Crystal Drinkwalter + Jazmyn Canning) “We tend to hang out at spots where we can have the doors open and the dogs can run free,” Drinkwalter added. “It’s not so much about being in the van. It’s about being outside and enjoying our time in nature.”

‘We can do it, too’: Ottawa-area couple ditches city life to live in a van by the ocean

The duo started their travels on Feb.8, 2019, buying and retrofitting a van to drive out west. They landed in Tofino, B.C., where they worked as waitresses, pocketing every penny thanks to their vehicle-turned-home (and a kind woman who offered them a cheap parking spot). The van’s living space, complete with two benches and a table, converts to sleeping quarters in the evening. (Submitted by Crystal Drinkwalter + Jazmyn Canning) “I’ve had people say they’ve always wanted to travel and were too nervous to travel to certain countries and that we’re two females doing it, they think they can now,” Canning said.