What Is A External Bec?

What Is A External Bec
To understand why they are called battery elimination circuits, you have to go back in time — way back to the early days of electric radio controlled vehicles. Back then, you had to have two batteries to power the vehicle — one to power the motor (like today) and another to power the radio system.

This second battery pack, usually just a holster to hold four AA batteries, was plugged into a battery port on the receiver. This was inefficient, as the batteries were heavy and took up space. Eventually, someone came up with the concept of a battery eliminator circuit — a device that could step down the voltage from the main battery to make it safe for the radio system to use, and eliminate the need for the second battery (hence the name).

The first BECs were built into the receiver, not speed controls, but eventually, as the need for more powerful BECs grew, the ESC manufacturers took it upon themselves to include them into their products. Thus the modern BEC was born. A BEC is (usually) a switching voltage regulator that turns on and off very rapidly so as to allow only the necessary amount of energy through at a time.

  1. This allows for high efficiency BECs that can supply high amounts of power, and even have output voltages higher than the input voltages.
  2. The average current rating of today’s built-in BECs hovers around 3 Amps, though some are much higher.
  3. Unfortunately, the demands of today’s high-torque servos in large-scale airplanes, rock crawlers and much more means these 3A BECs are occasionally not sufficient, and now we have external BECs available to take up the slack.

Using an external BEC isn’t as easy as simply plugging it in. There is some nuance to using an external BEC correctly. Here’s what you need to know.

Power is provided from the main battery, same as the built-in BEC on your speed control. However, that means the external BEC needs to be “tapped into” the power wires before they reach the speed control. There are multiple ways to do this: you could simply solder the positive and negative wires from the external BEC to the power connector on the ESC, or you could make a wiring harness that allows for a more modular, plug-and-play option. The external BEC can be plugged into any open servo port on your receiver. If you don’t have any open, you can also Y-Harness it into any servo or ESC-occupied port. The external BEC replaces a speed control’s built in BEC; they don’t play nice together. Thus the red wire on the ESC’s receiver lead must be either clipped or pulled out before it reaches the receiver. Failure to do this can result in the overloading of the built-in BEC on the speed control, damage to your servos, damage to the external BEC, or all three! If your external BEC has adjustable voltage output, make sure to set it properly for your servos’ specs – if the voltage is too high, you can damage your servos; too low, and you run the risk of brownouts or sluggish servos.

Those are only a couple of the BEC wiring options you can do, but they should start as a launching point for your own R/C vehicle. So if you’re experiencing brown-outs or slow actuating servos, maybe try an external BEC — it’s a great way to ensure constant power to your electronics! Good luck!

How does an external BEC work?

Dimension Engineering’s BEC FAQ What is a BEC? BEC stands for Battery Eliminator Circuit. In the old days of electric flight you had to use a separate 4.8V battery pack to power your receiver and servos. As the hobby evolved, speed controls started to include Battery Eliminator Circuits to power your receiver and servos, allowing you to get rid of the extra receiver battery pack.

How does a BEC work? A BEC is basically a step down voltage regulator. It will take your main battery voltage (e.g.11.1 Volts) and reduce it down to ~5 Volts to safely power your receiver and servos. What are the advantages of a BEC? If you are flying electric, a BEC is better than a battery pack in nearly all cases.

On average, the BEC will weigh 10-20 times less than a receiver battery pack! Then you have to take into account the hassle of charging the receiver pack. It is another battery you have to carry around along with another charger. Did you remember to charge it after the last time you flew? Uh-oh might want to double check that! With a BEC, you only have to worry about charging your main flight pack and then you are guaranteed to have a safe flight.

  • Glow planes usually need a receiver pack, but the vast majority of electric planes out there are better off with a BEC.
  • I have a 3A BEC in my speed control – is that enough? What is a switching BEC? It is very common for speed controls to have BECs rated at 2 or 3A.
  • However, what the manufacturers do not tell you is that this rating is only true for an input voltage of 6V.

The BEC on your speed control is what engineers call a ‘linear voltage regulator’. It works by burning up excess voltage and turning it into heat. The higher the input voltage, the more heat gets produced. If there is too much heat, then the BEC will either fry, or shut down! The result of this is that in real world situations, if you are running a 3S lithium battery pack, your ESC’s BEC will only be able to provide about 0.5A before it overheats.

At 4S, most ESC manufacturers don’t recommend you use the BEC at all, or at best power two small servos. Dimension Engineering’s BECs are a different type of voltage regulator – a switching voltage regulator. They do not care very much about what the input voltage is, and as such can provide your servos with their full current rating all the way up to 8S or more.

For more information on the principles of a switching BEC, please visit our beginner’s guide to switching regulators, What are the pros and cons of internal BECs and external BECs? Most speed controls nowadays have an internal 5V linear BEC. It is a nice cheap, simple solution that works very well at low voltages like 2S lithium and 6 cell NiCd packs.

If you are flying a 2S lithium aircraft, stick with the internal linear BEC on your speed control because it will be cheaper.3S lithium and above is where a switching BEC starts to pay off. Since the external switching BEC will work efficiently at higher voltages you will immediately notice your speed control running cooler.

You will be able to run more and more powerful servos. You will be guaranteeing reliable power to your receiver and servos. If you have ever suddenly lost power to your receiver in flight, then an external switching BEC may be the answer to your problems.

Are there any other reasons to get an external BEC? Some of the new Spektrum receivers draw significantly more current than a normal receiver, and are particularly sensitive to voltage fluctuations. An external switching BEC can help ensure your new receiver gets reliably powered. Our switching BECs also allow you to have a choice of output voltage – 5 volts or 6 volts.

I’m not using a speed control. Can I still use the BEC to give me a steady voltage? By all means! Dimension Engineering BECs maintain all their specifications without a speed control attached. Be sure to cover or clip the BEC’s ESC pins so they don’t electrically contact anything.5V or 6V? One of the great things about an external switching BEC is that it allows you to choose your voltage output.

  • Running at 5V gives you standard servo response.
  • Running at 6V means more power will be delivered to your servos, so you will get more speed and torque.
  • Running at 5V or 6V will depend on what you are flying, and how you personally like to fly.
  • A simple parkflyer that isn’t doing any complicated maneuvers will probably feel best at 5V.

If you are doing complicated 3D aerobatics with sharp turns, you will probably appreciate the response 6V gives you. Helicopter flyers especially like the response 6V gives them on a tail servo. If you decide you want to run at 6V, make sure your servos can handle it.

Most servos can, but some really tiny ones like the Hitec HS-50 will burn up at 6V. How will a switching BEC affect my flight time? Actually, it will barely make a difference to your flight time. Compared to your main motor, your receiver and servos barely draw much power at all. On a typical flight you can expect to have ~10 seconds less flying time if you have been using a receiver pack.

If you have been using a speed control’s linear BEC, then a switching BEC might get you ~10 seconds more flight time. Nothing really noticeable. I heard that switching BECs can put out harmful radio interference, causing reduced range. Is this true? This is true for a lot of the switching BECs on the market.

  1. This is because it is relatively easy to make a switching BEC that gives you 5V and powers your servos, but it is not easy to come up with a design that is free of radio interference.
  2. This takes hundreds of man hours, dozens of design revisions, expensive test equipment and extensive beta testing.
  3. At Dimension Engineering, we put the time, money and effort into developing BECs that do not radiate.
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As long as you keep the BEC at least 2 inches away from your receiver, antenna and other electronics, you will not experience any glitching. We guarantee it. Can you help me pick out a BEC? Here are some general guidelines for common configurations:

Plane setup Recommendation
Small planes with a 2S lithium pack Small planes with only 2 small analog servos and a 3S lithium pack No external BEC needed
Parkflyers with 4 to 6 sub-micro analog servos e.g. HS-55, HS-56 and 3+S lithium packs Parkflyers with 4 HS-81 servos and 3+S lithium packs ParkBEC
Small 3D/aerobatic flyers with 4 to 6 sub-micro analog servos e.g. HS-55, HS-56 and 3+S lithium packs Small 3D/aerobatic flyers with 4 HS-81 servos and 3+S lithium packs ParkBEC 6V
Sport planes, glow conversions, larger 3d planes, planes with multiple high torque servos, HS-65 servos and/or digital servos.3S to 8S lithium packs SportBEC

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Helicopter setup Recommendation Tiny coaxial helis (Blade CX, Lama) with 2S lithium packs No external BEC needed Micro helis with sub-micro analog servos e.g. HS-55, HS-56 and 3+S lithium packs.3xHS-56, 1xS9650 and a 401 Gyro is an especially popular combo with ParkBEC 6V. ParkBEC 6V Micro / mini helicopters with 3S to 8S lithium battery packs, running high speed/torque servos and/or digital servos.e.g. HS-65, HS-635, S9451, S9550 SportBEC Big helicopters with battery packs 9S to 14S lithium (33.6V to 60V) VHVBEC Really big (60″+) helicopters with battery packs 9S to 14S lithium (33.6V to 60V) with 4 digital servos drawing peak currents >1A Two VHVBECs in parallel

Contact us if you still need help choosing a product! Why should I get a BEC from Dimension Engineering when I can find a cheaper one elsewhere? A critical difference between our BECs and our competitors’ BECs is that our products are guaranteed to not cause radio interference.

  • You can get a cheap imported BEC, but you’d just be paying 10 bucks to knock your plane out of the sky! Every manufacturer likes to boast that their BEC won’t cause interference.
  • We actually have the data to prove it.
  • The #1 design criterion with all Dimension Engineering BECs is that they absolutely cannot put out any harmful interference.

Other guys cut costs in ways that are downright scary. Our BECs also have a throttle pass through system, which means you can use our BECs without snipping the red wire of your speed control. Our higher powered BECs have the world’s easiest to use 5V/6V selection system.

  • Just flick the slide switch with your finger! There are no jumpers to lose or any complicated programming procedures.
  • An LED will indicate whether you are in 5V or 6V mode.
  • Finally we have great customer support for our products.
  • In the extremely unlikely event of a problem with your BEC, we will quickly get a replacement out to you.

If you are confused on how to wire things up, send us an email and we will respond. Try doing that with an imported product!

What is an internal BEC?

What is a BEC? That’s a question I’ve heard quite a few times over the years. Before the BEC (we’ll get to what it is in a second), drivers used to install small, four-cell battery packs on their cars to power the electronics. Why? Well, back in the day, we’d need to use as much of the power in the NiCd and NiMh battery packs as possible to run the cars in a simple four-minute race. What Is A External Bec In turn, with better batteries come bigger brushless setups, and that enormous power draw can cause issues while trying to feed juice to the other components on the car. Enter the BEC, which stands for Battery Eliminator Circuit. How it works is quite simple; when you pull full throttle on your high-powered rig, a huge spike in energy travels from the battery to the motor (through the ESC).

  • This spike can be so big that power to the servo and receiver can be reduced, thus causing a slight stutter or even a momentary loss of control.
  • So the BEC is, essentially, a storage container for additional electricity.
  • It converts the input voltage down to 5V for use in your servos and receiver.
  • Internal BEC’s are typically linear, meaning they do their conversion and expel the remaining voltage as heat.

This can cause things to get hot fast, especially if you’re running a 3S (11.1) or higher battery setup. The solution? Install one of Castle Creation’s external BECs. This is a switching-type system which reduces voltage by switching on and off very quickly, creating a lot less heat.

  1. This setup is perfect for applications that use multiple servos or rigs that operate on more than 3S LiPo, like crawlers or larger monster trucks.
  2. Installation may vary slightly depending on your setup and might require you to do some solder- ing.
  3. Make sure, though, that if you choose to go with a Castle BEC that you disable your ESC’s built-in BEC (if it has one).

TOOLS NEEDED TO INSTALL A BEC -Soldering Iron -Solder -Wire Strippers -Shrink Tubing INSTALLATION Need help installing a Castle Creations BEC ? We’re here to help. We’ve created a video that helps walk you through the process of soldering a BEC into your vehicle.

What does a BEC do?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia In battery-powered equipment, a battery eliminator circuit ( BEC ) is an electronic voltage regulator used to power a subsystem at a different voltage without the need for a supplemental battery, BECs are commonly used in radio-controlled models, which need separate voltages to power the motor and the R/C equipment.

What is a BEC on RC car?

BECs — Castle Homepage CC BEC (Battery Eliminator Circuit) is a small device that eliminates the need for a receiver battery. It draws voltage from the motor batteries and drops it to a voltage level that is suitable for your receiver and servos. This is required in applications which use high power servos, where the ESC does not have an internal BEC, or the existing BEC is inadequate. What Is A External Bec From the trusted manufacturer of BECs comes the next generation of voltage regulators, Designed and assembled in the USA1, Castle Creations’ CC BEC 2.0 gives users higher voltage ranges in two unique packages, For pilots there is a smaller, lightweight (0.7 oz.) design capable of 14 amps peak, perfect for sport flying, helicopters, and UAVs, What Is A External Bec What Is A External Bec What Is A External Bec : BECs — Castle Homepage

How do you wire an external BEC?

To understand why they are called battery elimination circuits, you have to go back in time — way back to the early days of electric radio controlled vehicles. Back then, you had to have two batteries to power the vehicle — one to power the motor (like today) and another to power the radio system.

This second battery pack, usually just a holster to hold four AA batteries, was plugged into a battery port on the receiver. This was inefficient, as the batteries were heavy and took up space. Eventually, someone came up with the concept of a battery eliminator circuit — a device that could step down the voltage from the main battery to make it safe for the radio system to use, and eliminate the need for the second battery (hence the name).

The first BECs were built into the receiver, not speed controls, but eventually, as the need for more powerful BECs grew, the ESC manufacturers took it upon themselves to include them into their products. Thus the modern BEC was born. A BEC is (usually) a switching voltage regulator that turns on and off very rapidly so as to allow only the necessary amount of energy through at a time.

This allows for high efficiency BECs that can supply high amounts of power, and even have output voltages higher than the input voltages. The average current rating of today’s built-in BECs hovers around 3 Amps, though some are much higher. Unfortunately, the demands of today’s high-torque servos in large-scale airplanes, rock crawlers and much more means these 3A BECs are occasionally not sufficient, and now we have external BECs available to take up the slack.

Using an external BEC isn’t as easy as simply plugging it in. There is some nuance to using an external BEC correctly. Here’s what you need to know.

Power is provided from the main battery, same as the built-in BEC on your speed control. However, that means the external BEC needs to be “tapped into” the power wires before they reach the speed control. There are multiple ways to do this: you could simply solder the positive and negative wires from the external BEC to the power connector on the ESC, or you could make a wiring harness that allows for a more modular, plug-and-play option. The external BEC can be plugged into any open servo port on your receiver. If you don’t have any open, you can also Y-Harness it into any servo or ESC-occupied port. The external BEC replaces a speed control’s built in BEC; they don’t play nice together. Thus the red wire on the ESC’s receiver lead must be either clipped or pulled out before it reaches the receiver. Failure to do this can result in the overloading of the built-in BEC on the speed control, damage to your servos, damage to the external BEC, or all three! If your external BEC has adjustable voltage output, make sure to set it properly for your servos’ specs – if the voltage is too high, you can damage your servos; too low, and you run the risk of brownouts or sluggish servos.

Those are only a couple of the BEC wiring options you can do, but they should start as a launching point for your own R/C vehicle. So if you’re experiencing brown-outs or slow actuating servos, maybe try an external BEC — it’s a great way to ensure constant power to your electronics! Good luck!

What does BEC stand for?

Business email compromise (BEC)—also known as email account compromise (EAC)—is one of the most financially damaging online crimes. It exploits the fact that so many of us rely on email to conduct business—both personal and professional. In a BEC scam, criminals send an email message that appears to come from a known source making a legitimate request, like in these examples:

A vendor your company regularly deals with sends an invoice with an updated mailing address. A company CEO asks her assistant to purchase dozens of gift cards to send out as employee rewards. She asks for the serial numbers so she can email them out right away. A homebuyer receives a message from his title company with instructions on how to wire his down payment.

Versions of these scenarios happened to real victims. All the messages were fake. And in each case, thousands—or even hundreds of thousands—of dollars were sent to criminals instead.

What is a 10A BEC?

The Castle Creations BEC 10A Battery Eliminator Circuit is a little device that eliminates the need for a receiver and servo battery pack. It draws higher voltage from the motor batteries and drops it to a voltage level that is suitable for your receiver and servos.

Only 11 grams ! 10A Max Ouput 6S Max Input 4.8 – 9.0v selectable outputs

Only 11 grams ! The Castle Creations BEC 10A Battery Eliminator Circuit supports up to 10A max ouput and 6S max input. It has 4.8 – 9.0v selectable outputs. What Is A External Bec Double click on above image to view full picture BACK TO TOP

What is the difference between BEC and UBEC?

OK, it’s been covered but not always understood. What is a BEC? What is a UBEC? In an electric-powered radio controlled model, the BEC is typically part of the electronic speed control (ESC). BEC allows such a model to carry only one battery (the motive power battery) instead of two (motive power, and a separate battery to operate the R/C equipment).

  • A BEC-equipped ESC meant for airplane use often incorporates a low-voltage-cutoff (LVC) circuit which can sense the voltage drop caused when the battery has little charge left in it.
  • It then cuts the power to the ‘drive’ motor in order to provide the ‘steering’ servo(s) with enough power to be able to bring the model safely back to the operator.

The power to the propeller would be cut but the operation of the control surfaces would be maintained in order to perform a dead-stick landing, Without this feature, all control would be lost when the battery expired, probably resulting in the destruction of the model.

  1. In some cases, the BEC is part of the radio control receiver, instead of being part of the ESC.R/C BECs in their simplest form use a linear fixed voltage regulator with its standard circuit suggested in the manufacturer’s datasheet – usually the power supply of the receiver needs 5 V.
  2. Low-drop types are preferred – especially for batteries with only a few cells.

For small models, 1.5 to 2 A are enough; for mid-size models a 3 A type needs to be considered. BECs for large models have to provide current of 5 A or more. There a more complicated switched-mode regulator should be used, as the BEC has to deal with losses.

These losses are proportional to the difference of the target voltage of 5 volts and the voltage of the main battery; as well as they are proportional to the provided current. For example, take a 10-cell ( NiMh ) accumulator with a normal voltage of 12 volts. With a peak current of 5 A, the BEC will have losses of (12 V − 5 V) × 5 A = 35 W.

With a linear regulator, these 35 W will be converted to heat and so require a large heat sink. In all cases, it is a good idea to mount some large capacitors to buffer the regulated output. In large plane or ship models, another possibility is to buffer the power supply with a further capacitor near the actuator’s (servos).

  • Hey, that was stolen from Wikipedia, no, I wrote the entry for Wikipedia.
  • Now, what’s the difference between a BEC and a UBEC? These days, the term has become somewhat askew and considered the same and there are similarities.
  • In the beginning of HV electricity in RC, capacitor based circuitry was used to supply the correct voltage to the receiver and thusly the components.

Along came the UBEC Universal Battery Eliminator Circuit. They were big, clunky and always external. And then along comes the ESC with the appropriate circuitry built in and the common name BEC was used. So, what’s the difference. Again, the terms are askew no days but the original nomenclature of each is this.

  • The BEC is linear while the UBEC is considered a switch mode BEC.
  • The BEC has a more undisturbed signal an voltage and cheaper to manufacture.
  • Adversely, they are less efficient and generate higher temperatures at greater voltages.
  • The UBEC generally handles higher voltages, runs cooler and is more efficient.

On the down side, they have an increased component count so they are more expensive to produce and they have somewhat of a dull hum that makes them louder. Here’s a modified pic to show you how to hook one up. What Is A External Bec

What is the difference between BEC and SBEC?

A BEC is a Battery Eliminator Circuit. This provides a way for you to power other components, such as servos from a source that is more regulated than VBAT. An SBEC (Switching Battery Eliminator Circuit) and a UBEC (Ultimate Battery Eliminator Circuit) are both versions of BECs that are more efficient.

What is a micro BEC?

5V 0.5A Micro BEC What Is A External Bec £ 3.00 A BEC (Battery Eliminator Circuit) supplies a lowered voltage from the lipo suitable for the receiver and servos in your robot. This is a tiny BEC weighs barely more than a gram and takes a 2-4S input and outputs 5V at low current which is great for powering a receiver.

What does the R in RC stand for?

A resistor–capacitor circuit (RC circuit), or RC filter or RC network, is an electric circuit composed of resistors and capacitors.

What does R mean in RC?

R provides a resistance termination and RC provides resistance and condenser/capacitor termination.

How do you wire an external BEC?

To understand why they are called battery elimination circuits, you have to go back in time — way back to the early days of electric radio controlled vehicles. Back then, you had to have two batteries to power the vehicle — one to power the motor (like today) and another to power the radio system.

This second battery pack, usually just a holster to hold four AA batteries, was plugged into a battery port on the receiver. This was inefficient, as the batteries were heavy and took up space. Eventually, someone came up with the concept of a battery eliminator circuit — a device that could step down the voltage from the main battery to make it safe for the radio system to use, and eliminate the need for the second battery (hence the name).

The first BECs were built into the receiver, not speed controls, but eventually, as the need for more powerful BECs grew, the ESC manufacturers took it upon themselves to include them into their products. Thus the modern BEC was born. A BEC is (usually) a switching voltage regulator that turns on and off very rapidly so as to allow only the necessary amount of energy through at a time.

  1. This allows for high efficiency BECs that can supply high amounts of power, and even have output voltages higher than the input voltages.
  2. The average current rating of today’s built-in BECs hovers around 3 Amps, though some are much higher.
  3. Unfortunately, the demands of today’s high-torque servos in large-scale airplanes, rock crawlers and much more means these 3A BECs are occasionally not sufficient, and now we have external BECs available to take up the slack.

Using an external BEC isn’t as easy as simply plugging it in. There is some nuance to using an external BEC correctly. Here’s what you need to know.

Power is provided from the main battery, same as the built-in BEC on your speed control. However, that means the external BEC needs to be “tapped into” the power wires before they reach the speed control. There are multiple ways to do this: you could simply solder the positive and negative wires from the external BEC to the power connector on the ESC, or you could make a wiring harness that allows for a more modular, plug-and-play option. The external BEC can be plugged into any open servo port on your receiver. If you don’t have any open, you can also Y-Harness it into any servo or ESC-occupied port. The external BEC replaces a speed control’s built in BEC; they don’t play nice together. Thus the red wire on the ESC’s receiver lead must be either clipped or pulled out before it reaches the receiver. Failure to do this can result in the overloading of the built-in BEC on the speed control, damage to your servos, damage to the external BEC, or all three! If your external BEC has adjustable voltage output, make sure to set it properly for your servos’ specs – if the voltage is too high, you can damage your servos; too low, and you run the risk of brownouts or sluggish servos.

Those are only a couple of the BEC wiring options you can do, but they should start as a launching point for your own R/C vehicle. So if you’re experiencing brown-outs or slow actuating servos, maybe try an external BEC — it’s a great way to ensure constant power to your electronics! Good luck!

How is BEC done?

What is Business Email Compromise (BEC) According to the, BEC crimes were the costliest cyber threat of 2020, with adjusted losses estimated at $1.8 billion overall. The tells a similar story, slotting BEC as the second-riskiest data breach driver in 2020, riding the wave of rampant brand impersonation schemes, especially on social media.

  1. Similarly, the received reports of almost $30 million in 2020 BEC losses.
  2. The total for 2021 is estimated to be much higher, with over $26 million in losses reported during the first half of the calendar year alone.
  3. The above statistics reinforce how prevalent and dangerous BEC attacks are to companies and the individuals who are tricked into giving up money, company information, and technology.

The IC3 division recommends that company employees remain suspicious of email requests for secrecy or pressure to act quickly. and continuous education are vital in reinforcing the importance of being cyber aware of emails and the inbox. There are five types of BEC scams that you need to be aware of: These BEC schemes underscore the importance of providing company employees with security awareness education and knowledge that reinforces the importance of paying attention to email addresses, company names, and requests with even a hint of suspicion.

  1. Because of the nature of the crime, a BEC attack requires a strategic and thorough approach.1.
  2. The cyber criminal spends time researching the target company.
  3. The criminal uses publicly available information such as press releases, LinkedIn profiles, website content, and social media posts to collect the names and titles of key company personnel.

Some cyber criminals go so far as looking for travel plans, conference attendance details, company partners and investors, new product information, and basic facts about the company.2. Using this information, the cyber criminal then either hacks the company email system using a phishing technique or spoofs an email account of a key employee.3.

Once inside the company, the cyber criminal uses this email access and the information they’ve collected about the company to send targeted, familiar, and urgent emails to employees who the criminal believes will respond accordingly.4. Unsuspecting employees receive emails from the cyber criminal masquerading as a colleague, lawyer, or company partner requesting a payment, fund transfer, or confidential information.5.

Because the email address is familiar and the request is not out-of-the-ordinary, the innocent employee doesn’t think twice and does precisely as the cyber criminal requests. Typically, the employee believes they’re acting in the company’s best interest by paying an overdue invoice or transferring funds to a new company partner.

It’s important to remember that BEC schemes rely on savvy social engineering techniques and the human element of trust. allow you to identify which employees are prone to BEC scams and phishing attacks, demonstrating how easy it is for cyber security attacks like BEC to happen. To prevent BEC attacks, do the following: Educate your employees about the five types of BEC attacks.

Take advantage of to educate and identify BEC and phishing risks. Use proven and phishing simulation platforms to keep employees’ BEC and social engineering risks top of mind. Create internal cyber security heroes committed to keeping your organization cyber secure.

  1. Remind your security leaders and cyber security heroes to regularly monitor employee BEC and phishing awareness with phishing simulation tools.
  2. Take advantage of to educate, train, and change behavior.
  3. Provide ongoing communication and campaigns about cyber security, BEC, and social engineering.
  4. This includes establishing strong password policies and reminding employees about the risks that can come in the format of emails, URLs, and attachments.

Establish network access rules that limit the use of personal devices and the sharing of information outside of your corporate network. Ensure that all applications, operating systems, network tools, and internal software are up-to-date and secure. Install malware protection and anti-spam software.

  • Phishing simulation is the best way to raise awareness of BEC risks and identify which employees are at risk for BEC scams and phishing.
  • BEC relies on phishing techniques to access the company email system and uses social engineering techniques to convince employees to act as requested.
  • Phishing simulation lets you easily incorporate cyber security awareness training into your organization in an interactive and informative format.

People see first-hand how personalized trustworthy emails are used to steal personal and corporate information. Real-time BEC and phishing simulations are ideal for any organization to educate people and increase alertness levels to BEC schemes and techniques.

  1. Phishing simulations allow you to show employees in real-time how easy it is to fall victim to a BEC attack.
  2. Using real-world examples and sophisticated phishing simulations, employees realize why it is essential to verify email addresses and to confirm requests for funds or confidential information before acting.
  3. Phishing simulations give your organization these top 10 benefits in the defense against BEC scams and other cyber security threats:
  • 1. Measure the degrees of corporate and employee vulnerability
  • 2. Eliminate the cyber threat risk level
  • 3. Increase user alertness to BEC and phishing risk
  • 4. Instill a cyber security culture and create cyber security heroes
  • 5. Change behavior to eliminate the automatic trust response
  1. 6. Deploy targeted anti-phishing solutions
  2. 7. Protect valuable corporate and personal data
  3. 8. Meet industry compliance obligations
  4. 9. Assess the impacts of cyber security awareness training
  5. 10. Segment BEC and phishing simulation

To learn more about BEC and how you can keep your organization cyber secure, take advantage of our free cyber security awareness resources: What Is A External Bec What Is A External Bec What Is A External Bec Contact us at 1-866-889-5806 or at to learn more about BEC. Terranova Security is committed to delivering people-centric training that makes your organization cyber security aware. : What is Business Email Compromise (BEC)

How does a battery eliminator work?

Battery eliminator is used in place of ordinary dry batteries as power source for equipments like radio receivers AM/ FM, tape recorders, calculators etc. and other low power operated equipments. Battery eliminator’s output is DC voltage which usually varies from 1.5 V / 3 V to 12 Volts / upto 500 mA.